The Stone of Scone

Scones

The Stone of Scone has many names which I will mention later, but one of the most prominent difficulties is one of mispronunciation. Scone, to me, means fluffy baked goods as pictured – also identified by myself as ‘biscuits’ in my trips to hotels in Southern America.

It is actually pronounced  ‘Scoon.

The Stone of Scone (/ˈskn/Scottish GaelicAn Lia FáilScotsStane o Scuin)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stone_of_Scone

The Stone of Scone…

Here are some of those other names for the Stone of Scoon.

The Stone of Destiny; the Coronation Stone; the Stone of Jacob; and others including the Bethel Stone.

History

  • In 1292 John Balliol was the last king to use the Stone of Destiny.
  • In 1296 it was captured by Edward I of England and taken to Westminster Abbey in London.
  • It sat under the coronation chair, where English and British sovereigns sit during their coronation, for 700 years.
  • On Christmas Day 1950, four nationalist Scottish students removed the stone from Westminster Abbey and brought it back to Scotland. After a public outcry, it was found a few months later at Arbroath Abbey, draped in a Saltire, and taken back to Westminster Abbey by the police.
  • It was last used at the coronation of HM The Queen in 1953.
  • On St Andrews Day (30 November) 1996, the Stone of Destiny was returned to Scotland amid much ceremony and celebration and put in Edinburgh Castle alongside the Honours of Scotland. About 10,000 people lined the Royal Mile in Edinburgh to watch a procession of dignitaries and troops escort the stone from the Palace of Holyroodhouse at the bottom of the mile, to the castle.

https://www.visitscotland.com/about/uniquely-scottish/honours-scotland-stone-destiny/

In the bullet point history lies a wealth of feeling, especially if you have a tendency to Scottish Nationalism.

Sitting on the Stone of Scone

Stone of Scone replica
By sarniebill1 - https://www.flickr.com/photos/sarniebill/3481265834/, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=6886393

I sat on this replica of the stone when I was about nine or ten years old. Every week Primary School students paid threepence ). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Threepence_(British_coin)
This money was used to take the class on an outing… then one of historical significance. The site of Flodden Field, the Battle of Bannockburn as well as other Scottish historical sites. One of these was to Scone (Scoon) Abbey and the replica of the Coronation stone of the kings of Scotland. It was long before the days of digital cameras, so I have no evidence, but I guess my surviving classmates also sat on this replica ‘stone of destiny.’

Concluding

So, although it may sound like a stale tea time pastry, the Stone of Scone is an ancient symbol of Scottish sovereignty. According to legend, the sandstone slab was used by the biblical figure Jacob as a pillow when he dreamed of a ladder reaching to heaven and then brought to Scotland by way of Egypt, Spain and Ireland.
Nov 14, 2016
Copied from www.history.com – but site temporarily blocked.

And it is pronounced Scoon.

Language is a strange thing.

Susan