Was the Old Testament Done Away With?

Old testament removed?

I have heard many preachers say the Old Testament is done away. I cannot find where it says that in the Bible, and I have many versions I used for researching my book series. It would be logical to look for proof of that in the New Testament.

In the book of Hebrews…

In that He says, “A new covenant,” He has made the first obsolete. Now what is becoming obsolete and growing old is ready to vanish away.
Hebrews 8: 13

Has it vanished away? Let’s look.

On Passover night, Jesus kept the Passover…

and he said unto them, ‘With desire I did desire to eat this passover with you before my suffering,
Luke 22: 15 Young’s Literal Translation

Following the Passover, He instituted the new symbols – the bread and the wine.

Passover bread

Did this do away with the Old Testament?

After Jesus’ resurrection, He walked to Emmaus with two men.

Then Jesus said to them, “O foolish ones, how slow are your hearts to believe all that the prophets have spoken. Was it not necessary for the Christ to suffer these things and then to enter His glory?” And beginning with Moses and all the Prophets, He explained to them what was written in all the Scriptures about Himself.
Luke 24: 25 – 27 Berean Study Bible (Bolding mine)

In the often quoted Beatitudes – Jesus says a number of times “You have heard it said….” Then He goes on to say…” But I tell you…”

For example…
“You have heard that it was said to those of old, ‘You shall not murder, and whoever murders will be in danger of the judgment.’ But I say to you that whoever is angry with his brother without a cause shall be in danger of the judgment.
Matt 5: 21, 22 NKJV

This comes after He said…

“Do not think that I came to destroy the Law or the Prophets. I did not come to destroy but to fulfill. For assuredly, I say to you, till heaven and earth pass away, one jot or one tittle will by no means pass from the law till all is fulfilled.
Matt 5: 17,18 NKJV

Some say that Jesus’ death fulfilled the Old Testament.

However, heaven and earth do not pass away until the end of this age.

Then I saw a new heaven and a new earth, for the first heaven and the first earth had passed away, and the sea no longer existed.
Revelation 21: 1 Holman Christian Standard Bible

This is when heaven and earth pass away

Scattered through the New Testament

Are direct quotes from Old Testament scriptures, how do we cut those out?

(You can find a comprehensive list at this site

https://www.studylight.org/dictionaries/hbd/o/old-testament-quotations-in-the-new-testament.html)

One example…

As He says also in Hosea, “I will call those who were not my people, `my people,’ and her who was not beloved, `beloved.’ “
Romans 9: 25 New American Standard Bible

This was written by the Apostle Paul

Also written by the Apostle Paul. this time to Timothy…

and you remember that ever since you were a child, you have known the Holy Scriptures, which are able to give you the wisdom that leads to salvation through faith in Christ Jesus
2 Timothy 3: 15 Good News Translation.

The Holy Scriptures that the Apostles preached from was the Old Testament. They had no New Testament. They were writing it by their letters and in the gospels.

I believe we can learn much from the Old Testament.

These things happened to them as a warning to us. All this was written in the Scriptures to teach us who live in these last days.
1 Corinthians 10: 11 Contemporary English Version

For everything that was written in the past was written to teach us, so that through the endurance taught in the Scriptures and the encouragement they provide we might have hope.
Romans 15: 4 NIV

New Testament

More musing

Susan

God Still Chooses…

God chooses and sometimes is's a puzzle

God still chooses. (Although to us it is often a puzzle why.)

This is the second part of ‘From Moses to Donald Trump.’

In last week’s post we ‘skipped’ through the Old Testament looking at the way God chose leaders… and not always what we would call ‘good’ ones, at least not by our standards.

In the New Testament, God showed He was still in charge of the affairs of men.

God chooses Elizabeth

Who is she, you might ask. Elizabeth was the mother of John the Baptist. Like others before her, Elizabeth was barren. (In those days, being unable to bear a child  was a shame to a woman.)

God, intervened.

He had chosen a couple from the priestly line, Elizabeth and Zechariah to be the parents of the one who would announce the birth of the Messiah.

In the time of Herod king of Judea there was a priest named Zechariah, who belonged to the priestly division of Abijah; his wife Elizabeth was also a descendant of Aaron. Both of them were righteous in the sight of God, observing all the Lord’s commands and decrees blamelessly. But they were childless because Elizabeth was not able to conceive, and they were both very old.
Luke 1: 5 – 7

Before he had been born, God had chosen John the Baptist for this special purpose… to prepare the way for the coming Savior, Jesus Christ.

God chooses Mary

Mary was given the news that her elderly cousin Elizabeth was pregnant when the angel Gabriel came to her to announce that she had been chosen to bear the Savior.

(Mary’s reaction to that is recorded in the Bible. Luke 1: 34 – 38)

Mary visited the couple immediately after receiving this revelation that she, would miraculously conceive a son.

God chooses Mary and Elizabeth

Historical records are mostly silent about Jesus’ young years, with a couple of exceptions – that He grew in grace and stature and wisdom Luke 2: 40 as well as the incident when He was twelve years old and remained at the Temple after Passover and the Feast of Unleavened Bread, causing Mary and Joseph to worry. Luke 2: 46 – 48

The disciples are chosen, and trained.

I do nothing on My own initiative,
John 8: 38 (part)

So, Who was it chose the disciples? Did Jesus choose them on His Father’s guidance?
The Bible does not answer directly, but gives examples of times Jesus said He ‘always did the Father’s will.’

As He walked the country announcing the ‘good news of the Kingdom of God,’ He was also training the disciples.

Even so, they still expected the Messiah to be the conqueror who would drive out the Romans and restore Israel. It took the resurrection of Jesus and His opening the scriptures (Old Testament) for them to understand.

Jesus chooses Saul of Tarsus

A more unlikely person would be hard to find. Saul, who was renamed Paul, was a Pharisee. He persecuted the followers of the Way, as Christians of that time called themselves. But he was the one chosen to take the good news to the Gentiles. Jews did not like Gentiles, and the hierarchy of Jews in Jerusalem hated Paul and tried to kill him.

The people God chooses can be puzzling to us.

In the last century there have been some ‘good’ leaders and some terrible leaders. In our day, we in Western countries believe that we choose the leaders. Do we?

In Britain currently the country is divided in opinion about the leadership.

In Australia – another Prime minister has been replaced while in office.

In the US – I have never seen a US President so disliked, as the current president, Donald Trump.

God chooses Donald Trump

Yet, if we believe that God chooses…
By him times and years are changed: by him kings are taken away and kings are lifted up: he gives wisdom to the wise, and knowledge to those whose minds are awake:
Daniel 2: 21 (Bible in Basic English)

Then we have to believe that God is still on His throne and as it says in Daniel 4: 17 that ‘the Most High God rules in the kingdom of men, and give kingship to whoever He wants.’

It’s not only in the Old Testament…

Let everyone be subject to the governing authorities, for there is no authority except that which God has established. The authorities that exist have been established by God.
Romans 13: 1 NIV

The Most High Rules

Just a small observation… it does not say they have to be worthy of the position.

Continuing to consider the time and seasons

Susan

Blessing of Christian Historical Fiction

Potter and the clay

Whether Biblical Fiction or Christian Historical fiction is an ‘Ugly Truth’ or a ‘Blessing’ is up to each reader to decide. It is a personal choice.

The title of this weeks post in the series is ‘The Blessing…’

I have been greatly encouraged by the response of the named authors in last week’s post on Christian, Historical fiction. As I mentioned in the first post in this series, some of the writers on my list are more in the category of Biblical fiction, than Christian Historical Fiction. Still, I wonder how many of us – without deep study are aware of how much ‘New Testament’ principles are in what we refer to as the ‘Old Testament.’

Biblical Fiction or Christian Fiction?

Bible. One book, many stories

I am inclined to believe that the Bible is one book with two testaments as some of my studies revealed. This seems to be confirmed by Jesus Himself.

“You pore over the Scriptures because you presume that by them you possess eternal life. These are the very words that testify about Me,” 
John 5:39 Berean Study Bible.

 

For myself, I learn a lot from Biblical fiction writers such as Lynn Austin, Mesu Andrews and Jill Eileen Smith… mainly because the encourage me to see people or events in the Old Testament through different eyes… fresh eyes. I will never forget living through the construction of what is known as ‘Hezekiah’s tunnel’ – something that is easily read over in Scripture.
But I cannot just focus on the books of the aforementioned authors – all the writers who are skilled, and work hard with their research really do open the Bible to being more than stories… but being about people, the culture and the times.

Biblical fiction bears fruit

Present and past -

Last Friday I had the pleasure of speaking to a very welcoming church group. It was an enjoyable experience… and also illuminating. Another speaker, a member of their congregation shared his experience of living in Holland under Nazi rule. What he said was not fiction… but given that he was talking of events 73 years ago, it was historical. As I listened to his tale of living without electricity, gas, transport other than walking – my mind wandered to the number of times writing my book series where I had wished Naomi had a ‘proper’ cooker, or some of the key characters had even a landline telephone. The ‘perils’ of writing historical fiction, be it Christian or non-Christian remain the same… the lives of the characters, and their language was different to ours today.

The male speaker I referred to earlier certainly had the setting correct… well, he should, he lived through it. He talked about the culture of evening soirees where people visited each other and had musical evenings. I have seen this type of culture in good quality films of the period. This man was a walking historical experience.

An 'ugly' bit...

I recently gave up on a ‘Christian, Historical Fiction’ book because the main character seemed to have been plucked from modern times, stuck in a Biblical setting… and was so out-of-character with the mores of the time and culture… I could read no further.

Ugly bit over!

The gifted ones.

The authors I mentioned… and the others I read… clearly did not live through the events they write about. However, they have the gifting and determination to use the gifts to help the rest of us to ‘see’ the events – and people they write about.

These are the ones who open a window – or a door to Biblical fiction and help us discover the people.

Thank YOU!

Many thanks to those of you who completed the survey. Interestingly, there seems to be a fairly even split between readers who like Old Testament fiction and Christian Historical Fiction. The survey closes on the 5th July, so there is still time to have your say. Remember, it is anonymous, has six short questions, most of them multi-choice so if you like more than one item you can tick (check) more than one… or them all.

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/CFGD7KV

I will share the results with you, naturally.

Next week's guest...

Next week we have the privilege of hearing from Carol Ashby… who is a Christian, Historical Fiction writer. Not to be confused with the English actress Carol Ashby… this Carol Ashby is a retired scientist, with a passion for getting the details right.

Her novel, Forgiven, explores… well, I will leave it to you to find out next week. (I am often upbraided for giving ‘spoilers’ – so I am turning over a new leaf.)

Not a spoiler but – it is a fascinating story

Cover of Forgiven

As for this week’s featured image…
‘I am the potter, you are the clay’ seems appropriate to Christian/Biblical Historical Fiction writers. (Based on Isaiah 64:8)

Tread softly…

Susan

PS
Another link to the survey
                               https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/CFGD7KV