Identifying Signs

Humankind (to be politically correct) has used signs since they were able to scratch out a sign in the earth. Language developed from the signs and the featured image shows the Egyptian hieroglyphics. A lot more complex than my memory of childhood games in Scotland.

One such game was rather  elaborate game where someone would go off well ahead of the group and leave a chalk sign – usually an arrow, to indicate a change of direction. The rest of the group followed later, using the chalk signs to find the first person.

I remember an elaborate game where someone would go off well ahead of the group and leave a chalk sign – usually an arrow, to indicate a change of direction. The rest of the group followed later, using the chalk signs to find the first person.

chalk signs

This only works if the one the others is following gives accurate directions, and does not turn the opposite direction. In this such a case the sign would be misleading.

Signs can be ignored

 

Possibly the most common signs to be ignored would be speed limit signs or even a stop sign at a road junction.

(Sometimes with catastrophic consequences.)

Signs of Christian Faith

Many Christians identify themselves using a piece of jewelry – a cross, either as a necklace, earrings, or even a pin/badge.

Yet the Greek word translated as ‘cross’ is stauros which means stake.

According to The Companion Bible, crosses were used as symbols of the Babylonian Sun-god.

(Image of Shamash, sun-god, found on Pinterest.)

Last week I wrote about Constantine’s conversion.

It turns out that he is credited with bringing the ‘cross’ we recognize today into Christianity.

The most accepted reason for the “cross” being brought into Messianic worship is Constantine’s famous vision of “the cross superimposed on the sun” in A.D. 312. What he saw is nowhere to be found in Scripture. Even after his so-called “conversion,” his coins showed an even-armed cross as a symbol for the Sun-god.”

http://tyndalearchive.com/scriptures/www.innvista.com/scriptures/compare/heathenb.htm

(This information is available at several sites.)

History of Christian 'signs.'

Many of the ‘symbols’ we associate with Christianity were originally associated with Chaldean/Babylonian worship.

(I may share some of these fascinating details in a future post, but to do it here would take the post off-topic and be far too long.)

If you are interested do an Internet search on Tammuz (said to be the origin of the Tau cross.)

Early Christians' views on the 'Cross'

When writing the Apostle John Series, I spent years researching and endeavoring to walk in the shoes of those early Christians. One think I am clear on… to those early Christians the ‘cross’ or ‘stauros’ was an instrument of torture and death.

https://www.awesomestories.com/asset/view/Roman-Crucifixion-Method-of-Execution

Because crucifixion was an excruciating way to die, Rome did not impose this type of punishment on its own citizens.

(It is interesting that the image accompanying the article show crucifixion on a ‘stauros’, not a ‘cross.’)

So, to followers of the ‘Way’ the ‘cross’ would have been something to be loathed, as well as feared, not venerated

Still fascinated by research

Susan

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